How can we empower nurses?

How can we empower nurses? That’s the February #YearoftheNurseandMidwife blog challenge, it’s a good question that’s got me pondering this week.

Perhaps importantly empowering others starts with ourselves and the actions we can take. I remember last year when Ruth May started as the Chief Nursing Officer of England in January 2019 tweeting about creating #TeamCNO and encouraged others to join in. She set the tone and foundation of a culture aiming to include others, bringing them into the CNO team in an inclusive manner. Such an approach can be highly empowering, it encourages people to play their part and make a contribution to the agenda. Ruth through using twitter and that simple hashtag offered ‘permission’ to join in, to be part of the journey ahead as she works to amplify and celebrate the contribution of nurses and midwives across the NHS and beyond.

Sharing information is another way we can empower nurses. Often I worry about forwarding too much information when people are so busy, but in reality I know people are incredibly adept at filtering information that’s relevant to them. One of the great things about social media is we can share information freely, people can tap into it when it’s convenient to them, using hashtags can help in organising content too. I’m always grateful to colleagues who know which issues matter most to me and tag me in their tweets ensuring I get sight of something they think I’ll be interested in.

Encouraging people to set goals can be helpful too, the fabulous Jane of ‘Quiet the hive’ asks us each week to set our three intentions for the week ahead, sometimes I manage to achieve them, sometimes not, but it’s the thought process, the creation of some time and space that is really helpful. Nurses are busy people, not only in work but at home and in the community too, so we all need a little nudge sometimes to create some reflection space and to create goals or intentions to keep us focused.

Its important we acknowledge we work in highly complex environments, caring for people who are often at their most vulnerable, requiring not only expertise in compassion but also sophisticated technical skills. Sometimes we don’t possess all the knowledge we’d like and we may make mistakes. What’s vital is we share them openly so we can learn and address the issues. I remember as a junior staff nurse working in an incredibly technical environment surrounded by wonderfully competent staff, I constantly gave myself a really hard time about not being the expert I wanted to be and it contributed to me leaving after two years in the role, applying for a more generic post in a less technical environment. Whilst I loved the new job, I do wonder if I’d been kinder to myself and had the recognition from others that whilst I didn’t have their technical expertise, I could bring other things to the team may have made me remain in post longer to acquire the technical expertise others seemingly possessed? Colleagues and teams can be hugely influential in creating empowering environments in which we can flourish.

This week on twitter a great infographic was shared…

It seems to bring some key actions together, having a spirit of optimism, setting out a vision of what ‘best’ looks like, growing collaborations, being ‘human kind’, and having a belief in people’s potential. If we universally and consistently adopted theses approaches I wonder what impact it would have on empowering nurses and midwives?

Author: @kathevans2

I’m a Children’s Nurse who is passionate about improving healthcare and life with people who use services. I love getting out in the countryside or to the seaside to promote my mental health and well-being. On a journey to doing 100 marathons (slowly!) & part of team #NHS1000miles (new members always welcome!) I also love charity shopping, cooking and healthy eating too 😉 Sharing thoughts on a range of things that interest me. Comments, challenge, links to further thinking and research are most welcome. Learning and thinking together is always more fun!